Posted tagged ‘Chariot ride’

Sense and Sensibility 13-16: Curricles and Concealments

January 9, 2009

Here are some notes from Chapters 13-16 of Sense and Sensibility.

Plot Points

Despite a planned outing to Whitwell, Colonel Brandon excuses himself, much to the disliking of the group, and leaves the scene. Marianne Dashwood and Mr. Willoughby continue their enthusiasms toward each other, even to the extent of sneaking off to Allenham, much to the surprise of Elinor Dashwood. However, disappointment strikes as Willoughby leaves town in haste, declining an offer by the Dashwoods to stay. Elinor and her mother discuss why he might have left, and Marianne is deeply distressed. As Elinor and Marianne Dashwood are walking one day, they meet Edward Ferrar as he is walking up the road.

Character Commentary

I’d like to touch upon the attitude of Mrs. Dashwood in these chapters. When Willoughby leaves Barton, Elinor and Mrs. Dashwood speculate about the situation. “Something more than what he owned to us must have happened,” Elinor says. Her mother agrees but is somewhat optimistic about what may be the cause of Willoughby’s unusually unexplained exit. In thinking that the cause of the exit rests on Mrs. Smith, Willoughby’s aunt, Mrs. Dashwood seems to be hopeful of an eventual marriage, and even argues that Marianne and Willoughby are most likely already engaged, while Elinor is skeptical of making such a quick assumption.

Mrs. Dashwood: “Concealing it from us! my dear child, do you accuse Willoughby and Marianne of concealment? This is strange indeed, when your eyes have been reproaching them every day for incautiousness.” Is knowledge of character really the reason behing Mrs. Dashwood’s feelings? Or is she simply hopeful that the efforts that have gone into the courtship and eventual marriage between Marianne and Willoughby keeping her spirits up? Afterall, she is fully aware of the reality of the situation, yet almost forcefully optimistic, as Austen notes: “In about half an hour her mother returned, and though her eyes were red, her countenance was not uncheerful.”

The exit of both Colonel Brandon and Mr. Willoughby offer a fun—if simple—view of Marianne Dashwood’s feelings. Marianne has “no doubt of it” that Colonel Brandon left not at being called, but through his own forged (literally and in spirit) actions. Mr. Willoughby, on the other hand, elicits extreme emotional problems for her.

Here is Edward Ferrars at last, but where has he been?

Memorables

“I am afraid,” replied Elinor, “that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.”

“It may be proper to conceal their engagement (if they are engaged) from Mrs. Smith … But this is no excuse for their concealing it from us.” – Elinor Dashwood.

Looking Ahead

By the time I finish the story, will Chapter 14 have been that calm before the storm? The time before which a significant transformational event occured in for Marianne? To quote Willoughby there: “Tell me that not only your house will remain the same, but that I shall ever find you and yours as unchanged as your dwelling…”

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